COLD HOT

Mauri my dear readers,

I will not apologise for the delay in my post this time as I have realised a number of things and needed time to process them in my head. For starters, I’ve managed to catch the flu which at home would mean hot drinks and curling up in bed with a couple of blankets. Here it is somewhat different, confusion of which is escalated by cold showers and beads of sweat running down my body and when it is difficult to differentiate between the two. Episodes of a chesty cough combined with minutes at the bathroom sink ridding my body of the build up (i shall not describe any more to avoid loosing you). 7th day today but it feels like I might just be coming out the other way. Piece of advice- try not to get sick. Ha ha ha. A number of my fellow volunteers are also fighting exotic bugs! Atleast we are not in this alone.

Weatherwise, it has been rather cool and stormy since I fell ill. Last night and this morning in particular lead to leakage through the windows of my house. My flattie and I spent the morning moving furniture and mopping the floor. Looking around at the local houses, I can assure you, they aren’t so lucky. I understand that the road is particularly bad at the moment. Nothing new for the people of Tarawa eventhough it seems crazy to us. Water leakage inside the house is something they deal with even with light rain.

I’ve started to notice that things don’t seem to surprise me as much anymore. It is more of a surprise when things happen as they are supposed to. Perhaps because my mindset is shifting, expecting nothing to go as I expect so when it does, I am pleasantly surprised. Am I becoming more tolerant or are my expectations changing and aligning with the locals? Back home, we seem to stress out over little things and those matters seem trivial now. A bus being ten minutes late would drive me up the roof because back home it’s expected to be on time. Half an hour, an hour or more spent waiting for the bus here is normal, the internet not working is business as usual, a power outage is part and parcel of life, no fresh fruits and veggies is an accepted truth, death is as much a part of life as is life here and patience is core to the culture.

Is this the right way of living? Perhaps yes, perhaps no but it certainly feels like the right attitude to have. Stress is reserved for special occasions 🙂

On the work-front, it is going very well. I feel like things are happening and they are! My colleagues are very hard working and have lots of energy which is a blessing for a volunteer. It certainly has taken time but little successes are all it takes to make it all worth it.

Here’s a quote from a book I’m reading which makes much more sense being here- “When it is dark enough, you can see the stars” – Persian Proverb

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